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Course Announcements

Term Course Course satisfy general education requirements? General education requirement(s) this course will satisfy Course Description Course Contact
Winter 2021 HIST 2104 Special Topic: Naval History Yes

Pathway 2 - Critical Thinking in the Humanities
Pathway 7 - Critical Analysis of Equity and Identity in the United States
CLE Area 2 - Ideas, Cultural, Traditions, and Values
CLE Area 3 - Society and Human Behavior

This course will explore less traditionally emphasized periods and contexts of maritime history, dividing its focus between occidental and oriental spheres of its development. Specifically, the class will survey the arc of naval warfare during what is commonly referred to as the medieval period, and it will also examine the rich interaction of trade, statecraft, and piracy on the seas in Asia between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. hafurrow@vt.edu
Winter 2021 HIST 2604: Data in a Social Context Yes Pathway 2 - Critical Thinking in the Humanities
Pathway 5f - Foundational Quantitative and Computational Thinking
CLE Area 2 - Ideas, Cultural, Traditions, and Values
CLE Area 5 - Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning
This course examines the use of data to identify, reveal, explain, and interpret patterns of human behavior, identity, ethics, diversity, and interactions. It explores the historical trajectories of data to ask how societies have increasingly identified numerical measures as meaningful categories of knowledge, as well as the persistent challenges to assumptions about the universality of categories reducible to numerical measures. hafurrow@vt.edu
Winter 2021 HIST 3054: American Civil War Yes Pathway 1a - Advanced/Applied Discourse
Pathway 2 - Critical Thinking in the Humanities
CLE Area 2 - Ideas, Cultural, Traditions, and Values
This course will explore the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War, with an emphasis on transformations in regional and national identity, race relations, the status of African Americans, gender roles, military affairs, and the United States' place on the world stage. Students will develop skill in written and oral discourse. hafurrow@vt.edu
Winter 2021 HTM 2314: Introduction to International Business No Not applicable This exciting course covers the fundamental concepts of international business. Learn why international businesses exist, drivers of international expansion, differences among countries in terms of political, legal, economic, technological and cultural dimensions, as well as the complexity of international business decisions. Focus on a number of industries, including hospitality and tourism. Heather Simpson
Winter 2021 HTM 2454: Travel and Tourism Management No   Not applicable This exciting course covers the introduction to travel and tourism both domestically and abroad. Includes topics such as the history, sociology and psychology of tourism; the tourism system, including private industry, associations and governing bodies; measuring and predicting travel motivations, behavior, and demand; and management issues in a global context. Course concludes with an international travel research final project. Heather Simpson
Winter 2021 STS 1504: Introduction to Science, Technology, and Society Yes Pathway 2 - Critical Thinking in the Humanities
Pathway 3 - Reasoning in the Social Sciences
CLE Area 2 - Ideas, Cultural, Traditions, and Values
STS 1504 is an introduction to ways of thinking about the relationships between science, technology, and society. We will be using humanities and social studies methods and theories to discuss topics such as data, medicine, and technological development. This course will provide tools to help students think critically about the roles of data, science, and technology in their lives. Roan Parrish
Winter 2021 STS 3104: Science & Technology in Modern Society (Science, Technology, & Warfare) Yes Pathway 2 - Critical Thinking in the Humanities
CLE Area 2 - Ideas, Cultural, Traditions, and Values
Science, Technology, and Warfare examines selected interactions among these areas in modern Western history, primarily over the roughly two centuries from before the American Civil War through the Cold War. Which new technologies and engineering practices stood out in the US Civil War, and why? When and why and how did "information warfare" begin to become prominent in war fighting? Why were military commanders sometimes resistant to deploying new technologies? How do different technologies affect differently the military personnel actually using them? If World War I is called "the chemists' war" and World War II "the physicists' war," what about other kinds of scientists and other wars? In what ways did the Cold War transform patterns of science and engineering R&D that are still with us? Would we have had the same sciences and technologies with or without military sponsorship? The course ends with a consideration of the impacts of drone and cyber technologies on warfare and on military personnel today and in the future. Dr. Barbara Reeves
Spring 2021 CHN 1105: Elementary Chinese No Not applicable Have fun learning Chinese! You will acquire the fundamentals of the Chinese language with emphasis on developing proficiency in practical language use and cultural competency. 1105 is for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Ming Chew Teo
Spring 2021 EDCI 2614: Reading and the Mind Yes Pathway 3 - Reasoning in the Social Sciences Ever wonder how people become literate? This course surveys the theories and research that explain how people learn to read. Brief overview of English written systems. Models of skilled reading, literacy stages, and component processes (e.g, decoding, comprehension). Application of course concepts to self, common myths, media, and products. Analysis of patterns of inequity in reading achievement (3H, 3C) Particular emphasis given to learning about personal literacy development. Heidi Anne Mesmer
Spring 2021 ENGL 2634: Writing and Social Justice
Yes Pathway 1a - Advanced/Applied Discourse
Pathway 7 - Critical Analysis of Equity and Identity in the United States
This class will grapple with the intersection of writing, broadly defined, and social justice. Although social justice movements happen around the world in various contexts, our class will look at these movements from within and against a U.S. context, uncovering the ways citizens, artists, celebrities, and political figures have shaped notions of social and cultural issues through writing. We will seek to uncover through discussion and analysis how hashtags, such as #SayHerName, #Icantbreathe, #BlackLivesMatter, #MeToo, #Equality, #Feminism, become ways to channel information to audiences and disrupt perceptions via social media. We will look at how writers use essays, poems, articles, manifestos, and other “traditional” forms of writing to express personal experiences and critique society. We will immerse ourselves in sounds and visuals to uncover the rhetorical effects these modes of communication have toward building community and promoting equity. Students will have opportunities to apply their rhetorical, analytical, and creative skills through designing writings that seek to communicate a central message around a social justice movement of their choosing, and students will work as a community to create a showcase of final projects. jrgreene@vt.edu
Spring 2021 HIST 2104: History of Public Health Yes Pathway 2 - Critical Thinking in the Humanities
Pathway 7 - Critical Analysis of Equity and Identity in the United States
CLE Area 2 - Ideas, Cultural, Traditions, and Values
CLE Area 3 - Society and Human Behavior
This course will examine the history of health and politics from the founding of the United States through today's pandemic. Students will read about previous conflicts between public health imperatives and topics such as individualism, religious observance, economic growth, and distrust of experts. In addition to assigned readings, students will conduct independent research on a particular conflict and how that has changed over time, so we can better understand the many pressures coming to bear on American society during our current pandemic. Dr. Melanie Kiechle
Spring 2021 HIST 2104: Slavery, Law and Warfare in North America Yes Pathway 2 - Critical Thinking in the Humanities
Pathway 7 - Critical Analysis of Equity and Identity in the United States
CLE Area 2 - Ideas, Cultural, Traditions, and Values
CLE Area 3 - Society and Human Behavior
Examines how war, slavery, and law have developed concurrently to shape North America from the Middle Ages into the late nineteenth century. Examines the intersection of war, slavery, and law using the perspectives of men, women, and children from numerous regions, nationalities, cultures, ethnicities, economic practices, and religious beliefs. Class will meet on Tuesdays in-person every other week and on Thursdays online every week. The instructor will let you know which weeks you will be meeting in person on Tuesdays. Dr. Caroline Newhall
Spring 2021 HIST 2114: Espionage & Surveillance Yes Pathway 2 - Critical Thinking in the Humanities
CLE Area 2 - Ideas, Cultural, Traditions, and Values
CLE Area 7 - Critical Issues in a Global Context
This course covers espionage and surveillance from antiquity up to the beginning of the 20th century. We will explore the different motives, ethics, and technologies to gather intelligence and maintain secrecy in matters of state, with special attention to Italy, France and Great Britain. Reading and discussion will explore the role of trust and distrust in communications during times of peace and war. Students will learn digital history approaches using historical databases such as the Medici Archives and the British State Papers. Dr. Rachel Midura
Spring 2021 HIST 2124: Global History of Terrorism Yes Pathway 2 - Critical Thinking in the Humanities
CLE Area 2 - Ideas, Cultural, Traditions, and Values
CLE Area 7 - Critical Issues in a Global Context
A historical survey of the goals, strategies, and impacts of state-sponsored and non-state terrorism, with case studies from the Age of Revolutions to the contemporary era. Dr. Anndal Narayanan
Spring 2021 HIST 2715: History of Technology Yes Pathway 3 - Reasoning in the Social Sciences
CLE Area 3 - Society and Human Behavior
Explore the development of technology and engineering in their social and cultural contexts, examining the creation and modification of technologies to establish the basic structures of civilization, from prehistory to the Industrial Revolution (about 1800). Dr. Richard Hirsh
Spring 2021 MGT 2204: Global Business of Pop Culture
Yes Pathway 2 - Critical Thinking in the Humanities
Pathway 7 - Critical Analysis of Equity and Identity in the United States
This semester, we will analyze the global business of pop culture through an interdisciplinary, semester-long case study of the SUPERHERO Industry. By (literally and analytically) looking at this industry in all its forms - Comicbooks, TV shows, Movies, Comicons, Video games, and more - we will investigate how social, historical, political, and economic forces shape, and are shaped by, business-decision making at local and global scales. Our guiding questions are: How has this industry responded (or not) over time to changing social, political and economic dynamics over time? How have the business-decisions the industry leaders made challenged, created, and/or reinforced existing norms and social conditions over time and around the world? Overall, have superheroes, through their industry leaders, been used for more good or ill? Come join the discussion!

Eli Jamison

 

Spring 2021 UH 1604: Introduction to Research Methods No   Not applicable Any student with a cumulative GPA of 3.6 or higher is eligible to take these UH courses, whether they are pursuing an honors diploma or not. Moreover, there are no prerequisites for these UH courses. Are you interested in engaging in research as an undergraduate, either independently or as part of a faculty project? Do you think you might be interested in a job as a researcher or in going to graduate school? Take UH 1604 to learn about critical practices in undergraduate quantitative and qualitative research including generating focused research questions, finding scholarly literature, organizing data, conducting ethical research, collaborative research practices, and identifying venues to present research findings. Learn about other Honors students who have engaged in undergraduate research, and start making connections with faculty and peers that might lead to research opportunities in the future! aknox@vt.edu
Spring 2021 UH 3204: Honors Service Learning No Not applicable Any student with a cumulative GPA of 3.6 or higher is eligible to take these UH courses, whether they are pursuing an honors diploma or not. Moreover, there are no prerequisites for these UH courses. Live out Virginia Tech’s motto Ut Prosim (That I May Serve) while gaining practical experience desired by employers and adding to your portfolio of work. Earn 3 honors elective credits while serving the community through interdisciplinary team projects, all online! Learn more about yourself and your community while working with other students who share different perspectives from your own. In this project-based course you will work with other students across disciplines to create online resources in response to community-identified needs in areas such as homelessness, social connection and well-being among teenagers, college-going, drones and water quality, monitoring heartbeats in animals and humans, sustainability, mental health and plant care, and STEM education. Learn how to communicate with diverse audiences, safely work with preKindergarten through high school students, and have fun while doing it! Chelsea Lyles
Spring 2021 UH 3614: Data Collection and Analysis No Not applicable Any student with a cumulative GPA of 3.6 or higher is eligible to take these UH courses, whether they are pursuing an honors diploma or not. Moreover, there are no prerequisites for these UH courses. More and more, we are asked to critically evaluate and understand complex data and statistics. But what do all of those numbers really mean? How do we account for personal experiences? How do we distinguish between information that is enlightening and information that is misleading? In UH 3614 you will learn how to work with multiple types of data, collect, clean and manage data, evaluate the work of others, and communicate evidence-based conclusions to general audiences. After taking this course, you will be prepared to work with and talk about data as a researcher. lewissn@vt.edu
Spring 2021 UH 4504: Honors SuperStudio No Not applicable Any student with a cumulative GPA of 3.6 or higher is eligible to take these UH courses, whether they are pursuing an honors diploma or not. Moreover, there are no prerequisites for these UH courses. The Honors College SuperStudio provides students with instruction and practice in the transdisciplinary and massively-collaborative skills they will need to employ as professionals and citizens to address critical 21st century issues. In Spring 2021, the SuperStudio will harness the work of four advanced courses to examine the potentials and challenges of addressing interconnected crises in climate change and economic inequality outlined in the Green New Deal. All four courses will meet at the same time and place to facilitate collaboration within and across the classes. Students will enroll in one of the following four courses and in UH 4514: Honors SuperStudio, a required 1-credit co-requisite. UH 4504: Environmental Policy and Social Change UH 4504: Data Analysis for Health Reform UH 4504: The Future of Higher Education UAP 4914: The Future of Employment aknox@vt.edu
Spring 2021 UH 4984: Studio+ No Not applicable Any student with a cumulative GPA of 3.6 or higher is eligible to take these UH courses, whether they are pursuing an honors diploma or not. Moreover, there are no prerequisites for these UH courses. Studio+ aims to enhance Virginia Tech’s leadership role in transdisciplinary and trans-sector education in collaborative sociotechnical innovation. The course introduces students to key ideas about collaborative sociotechnical innovation in an Industry 4.0 context including design thinking, systems thinking, value propositions, and sustainable development. Working in teams, students will gain hands-on project based experience through collaborations with industry and nonprofits partners in the Industry 4.0 for Sustainable Development Lab. aislingk@vt.edu